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dc.contributor.authorBeazley, Karen Faye.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-21T12:37:53Z
dc.date.available2014-10-21T12:37:53Z
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.identifier.otherAAINQ36569en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10222/55581
dc.descriptionThis thesis examines biodiversity management in Nova Scotia with a particular focus on protected areas. The necessity for species-population level considerations. In biodiversity management is demonstrated. An approach for identifying focal-species is developed and tested. Potential focal-species are identified. The focal-species approach is then adapted and utilized to select Indicator species to monitor biodiversity in Kejimkujik National Park. Finally, links are made between focal-species and landscape-level considerations in Nova Scotia by considering habitat requirements of viable populations.en_US
dc.descriptionThe framework was found to be useful for identifying potential mammal, reptile and amphibian, and freshwater fish focal-species.en_US
dc.descriptionThe focal-species framework was also found to be useful for identifying potential indicator species for monitoring population dynamics as a measure of biodiversity.en_US
dc.descriptionFocal-species may also be linked to the landscape-level by defining parameters relative to the resource or habitat requirements of the most demanding focal-species. If the landscape requirements of the most vulnerable and demanding focal-species are met, then many other species will also be protected. Focal-species were characterized according to threats and habitat or resource requirements. They were also categorized as area-, dispersal-, resource-, or process-limited, after Lambeck (1997). Focal-species requiring landscape-level biodiversity management attention include: American moose, fisher, eastern cougar, lynx, little brown bat, northern longeared bat; wood turtle, Blanding's turtle, northern ribbon snake and Pickerel frog; Atlantic whitefish, Atlantic salmon, and brook trout. Additional information regarding specific species-population-habitat relationships for particular regional or biogeographical contexts is required to make precise prescriptions for landscape-level parameters such as habitat requirements.en_US
dc.descriptionThe thesis concludes that species-population-level considerations are necessary for biodiversity management. The focal-species approach may be the best way to integrate and focus information and initiatives at various levels. A regional population-level approach is recommended to take into account variations in population and habitat status and biogeographic context. The approach could also be adapted for other applications and jurisdictions.en_US
dc.descriptionIn summary, several focal-species were identified in every assessment and thus warrant special biodiversity management attention at all levels: Eastern cougar, lynx, American marten, fisher, American moose; wood turtle, Blanding's turtle, northern ribbon snake, blue-spotted salamander, four-toed salamander; and, Atlantic sturgeon, Atlantic salmon, Atlantic whitefish, brook trout, lake trout and blueback herring. Other potential focal-species requiring additional research include bats and frogs. Other classes of flora and fauna should be assessed to identify a full suite of focal-species for biodiversity management attention in Nova Scotia. These focal-species can provide a focus for numerous biodiversity planning and management initiatives including partnership and co-operative arrangements and education. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Dalhousie University (Canada), 1998.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherDalhousie Universityen_US
dc.publisheren_US
dc.subjectBiology, Ecology.en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Zoology.en_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental Sciences.en_US
dc.titleA focal-species approach to biodiversity management in Nova Scotia.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.contributor.degreePh.D.en_US
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