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dc.contributor.authorSwatuk, Larry Anthony.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-21T12:33:21Z
dc.date.available2014-10-21T12:33:21Z
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.identifier.otherAAINN93748en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10222/55398
dc.descriptionExtant studies of the foreign policies of Southern African states have been dominated by opposing realist and dependency modes of analysis. As a result, virtually all studies of Southern Africa give at best only partial accounts of the cause(s) and effect(s) of "destabilisation" in the region. With the end of the Cold War and the imminent demise of apartheid, however, it is time to reevaluate approaches and reinterprets events in this troubled region.en_US
dc.descriptionThis thesis critically examines the foreign policies of three of the smallest states in the region--Botswana, Lesotho, and Swaziland--over the 1975-89 period, a period most closely associated with South Africa's strategy of "regional destabilisation". BLS have long been regarded as "hostages" to apartheid with little scope for independent foreign policy-making. Realist analysis attributes this to a lack of power, particularly in relation to the "regional hegemon", South Africa. The dependency school, meanwhile, links this to the underdeveloped nature of their economies and the comprador nature of their elites. In this case, South Africa is viewed as a "sub-imperial power" or "outpost of monopoly capitalism". While each of these interpretations provides insight into the dilemmas facing all social formations in the region, they are unnecessarily opposed and over-simplified. In contrast, my political economy approach seeks to interrelate, rather than separate, notions of state and class, structure and choice. It is shown that BLS policy-makers have actively and imaginatively pursued status quo-oriented foreign policies which have, for the most part, successfully minimised the negative effects of South African destabilisation. However, I conclude that this status quo approach will prove inadequate in meeting the fundamental post-Cold War challenge posed by the extension to the region of a new international division of labour and power.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Dalhousie University (Canada), 1993.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherDalhousie Universityen_US
dc.publisheren_US
dc.subjectHistory, African.en_US
dc.subjectPolitical Science, International Law and Relations.en_US
dc.titleDealing with dual destabilisation in Southern Africa: Foreign policy in Botswana, Lesotho, and Swaziland, 1975-1989.en_US
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dc.contributor.degreePh.D.en_US
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