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dc.contributor.authorMein, Stewart A. G.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-21T12:35:48Z
dc.date.available2014-10-21T12:35:48Z
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.identifier.otherAAINN05180en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10222/55027
dc.descriptionThis dissertation examines the origin and growth of the adult education movement in the Canadian overseas military forces in the First World War, as presented through official military documents and the letters written by two of the principal participants, Clarence MacKinnon, then Principal of Pine Hill Divinity School, Halifax and Edmund Oliver, then Principal of St. Andrew's Theological College, Saskatoon.en_US
dc.descriptionThe dissertation outlines the scope of the adult education movement in the CEF in World War One, tracing four distinct phases of development of the movement. The first of these phases began in August, 1914, at Camp Valcartier, and grew out of the YMCA's mandate to provide educational activity to the CEF. In the second phase of adult education activity, Khaki Colleges were instituted in the 5th Canadian Division in Witley Camp, in Britain, by Clarence MacKinnon and spread to other camps through the work of the Chaplain Service. The third phase took place in France, in the Canadian Corps, where the University of Vimy Ridge was formed by E. H. Oliver under the direction of General Lipsett of the 3rd Canadian Division. In the fourth phase, the Khaki University was instituted in Britain by the Canadian Education Service under H. M. Tory in early 1918. The Khaki University absorbed the Khaki Colleges in Britain and the University of Vimy Ridge in France and began work in the other units in France such as the Forestry Corps.en_US
dc.descriptionThis dissertation puts forward three conclusions about the adult education movement in the Canadian overseas forces during the First World War. First, Henry Marshall Tory, then Principal of the University of Alberta, is usually given credit for starting the adult education movement in the CEF during World War One. Although Tory was one of the founders of the educational movement, evidence, primarily their own words, indicates that Clarence MacKinnon and E. H. Oliver did the work that turned his planning into actuality. Secondly, although it can be accurately said that the adult education movement in the Canadian forces overseas provided the impetus for similar movements in other armies, it has been generally understood that it was the activity of the Khaki University in Britain under Tory that provided the basis for the adult education activity that spread throughout the British and Dominion armies and then to other armies of the world. In fact, it was the work of Oliver and the University of Vimy Ridge that became the "model" for educational work in the British and Dominion field armies. Finally this dissertation also shows that although the adult education movement overseas provided the impetus for similar activity in other armies around the world, it had little effect on the post-war, re-establishment activity in Canada, or on subsequent adult educational activity in the post-war Canadian civilian or military adult education community until World War Two.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Dalhousie University (Canada), 1994.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherDalhousie Universityen_US
dc.publisheren_US
dc.subjectHistory, Canadian.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Adult and Continuing.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, History of.en_US
dc.titleA grand experiment: Adult education in the Canadian overseas military forces during the First World War.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.contributor.degreePh.D.en_US
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