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dc.contributor.authorHauser, Shane
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-07T13:01:58Z
dc.date.available2021-04-07T13:01:58Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10222/80342
dc.description.abstractA strong connection to nature, wilderness, and landscape provides the foundation onto which life is constructed. But forces of industrialization and globalization have brought us to a time in which our built environments and culture have become disconnected from the natural environment and as a result we have lost our understanding of nature as the source of everything, physical and spiritual. This thesis explores how architecture situates us physically and spiritually in the natural world enabling us to set down roots in a place. A design method that draws on environmental tectonics, ecology, and phenomenology is used to study the genius loci as a grammar of place and develops interventions at three scales of experience from the individual to the community—chapel to church.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectArchitectureen_US
dc.subjectNatureen_US
dc.subjectPhenomenologyen_US
dc.subjectEdmontonen_US
dc.subjectWildernessen_US
dc.subjectTectonicsen_US
dc.subjectGenius Locien_US
dc.titleNorth Saskatchewan Spiritual: Reconnecting with Nature in the Edmonton River Valleyen_US
dc.date.defence2021-03-15
dc.contributor.departmentFaculty of Architectureen_US
dc.contributor.degreeMaster of Architectureen_US
dc.contributor.external-examinerChristopher Trumbleen_US
dc.contributor.graduate-coordinatorSteve Parcelen_US
dc.contributor.thesis-readerCatherine Venarten_US
dc.contributor.thesis-supervisorTalbot Sweetappleen_US
dc.contributor.ethics-approvalNot Applicableen_US
dc.contributor.manuscriptsNot Applicableen_US
dc.contributor.copyright-releaseNot Applicableen_US
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