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dc.contributor.authorPandey, Anjali
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-31T17:30:46Z
dc.date.available2020-08-31T17:30:46Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10222/79777
dc.description.abstractThe aim of the current study was to determine whether differences in the nature of encoding that underlies to-be-remembered (TBR) vs. to-be-forgotten (TBF) items are responsible for the disparity in the quality of their memory traces. In separate experiments, the study phase of an item-method directed forgetting paradigm was followed by a recognition memory test in which previously studied words were mixed with foils of two types: 1) unrelated foils that had no explicit relation to studied TBR or TBF words and 2) similar foils that either sounded similar (Experiment 1), were visually similar (Experiment 2) or had a similar meaning (Experiment 3) to a studied word. An analysis of similar foil false alarm rates showed that while TBR and TBF words are equally likely to be represented in memory in terms of their acoustic and visual properties, meaning is more likely to be encoded following an intention to remember.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectmemoryen_US
dc.subjectencoding processesen_US
dc.subjectdirected forgettingen_US
dc.titleIntentional Forgetting Diminshes the Likelihood of Semantic Encoding in the Item-method Paradigmen_US
dc.date.defence2020-08-25
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychology and Neuroscienceen_US
dc.contributor.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
dc.contributor.external-examinern/aen_US
dc.contributor.graduate-coordinatorShelley Adamoen_US
dc.contributor.thesis-readerGail Eskesen_US
dc.contributor.thesis-readerShannon Johnsonen_US
dc.contributor.thesis-supervisorTracy Taylor-Helmicken_US
dc.contributor.ethics-approvalReceiveden_US
dc.contributor.manuscriptsYesen_US
dc.contributor.copyright-releaseNot Applicableen_US
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