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dc.contributor.authorSahagun, Christopher
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-10T12:59:12Z
dc.date.available2020-08-10T12:59:12Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10222/79633
dc.description.abstractThis thesis examines the abandonment and potential of gas stations in Windsor, Ontario. As ubiquitous structures of the urban roadside, gas stations became an important piece of infrastructure for the city and the automobile. The emergence of new technology, alternative fuels, and a shift in attitudes reduces our future dependence on gas stations. As a result, existing gas stations will be at risk of abandonment. As urban infrastructure, this is an opportunity to create new narratives with city events and reintegrate gas stations that engage the neighborhood. Introducing new architectural elements, this thesis seeks to transform the gas station into the Event Station, a public space that is both ordinary (for the everyday) and special (for city events), a place for inhabitation.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectArchitectureen_US
dc.subjectUrban Infrastructureen_US
dc.subjectGas Stationsen_US
dc.subjectEvent Stationsen_US
dc.titleEvent Stations: A New Narrative for Declining Gas Stationsen_US
dc.date.defence2020-06-22
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Architectureen_US
dc.contributor.degreeMaster of Architectureen_US
dc.contributor.external-examinerMaria Arqueroen_US
dc.contributor.graduate-coordinatorSteve Parcellen_US
dc.contributor.thesis-readerDiogo Burnayen_US
dc.contributor.thesis-supervisorSteve Parcellen_US
dc.contributor.ethics-approvalNot Applicableen_US
dc.contributor.manuscriptsNot Applicableen_US
dc.contributor.copyright-releaseNot Applicableen_US
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