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dc.contributor.authorLu, Ping
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-28T15:40:00Z
dc.date.available2019-11-28T15:40:00Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10222/76681
dc.description.abstractWe reside in an aging global society. What people do as they age has been studied extensively in the leisure and aging literature. A variety of theories, such as the activity, continuity, disengagement, and innovation theories, have been developed to understand how older individuals engage in opportunities. “Leisure” is a Eurocentric term that does not exist within all cultural frameworks. The question arises: how do older people find meaning in opportunities in which they engage, such as Tai Chi? This study examined the meaning of Tai Chi for older participants in Halifax, Canada, and Jinan, the People’s Republic of China. An ethnographic approach guided my research. Nineteen participants were recruited in each city. Data were collected through participant observation and individual in-depth interviews using open-ended questions. The interviews in Canada were carried out in English, whereas the ones in China were conducted in Mandarin or the Jinan dialect. Four main themes emerged from the collected data: 1) Health and wellbeing; 2) Socializing; 3) A sense of group identity; and 4) Cultural pride. The themes were interactive and reflected the complexities of cultural influence. The findings of this study suggest that although Tai Chi does have different philosophical meanings for participants in the two cities, it serves a similar role with regard to socializing with “Tai Chi friends,” experiencing a sense of group identity, and seeking good health. The characteristics of the Tai Chi experience may provide insights into future research similar to Susan Shaw’s characteristics of “leisure.”en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectolder peopleen_US
dc.subjectTai Chien_US
dc.subjectPerceptionsen_US
dc.subjectCanadaen_US
dc.subjectChinaen_US
dc.titleTai Chi: A New and Ancient Reality: The Socio-Cultural Context of Older People who Practice Tai Chi in Halifax, Canada and Jinan, Chinaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.date.defence2018-06-27
dc.contributor.departmentInterdisciplinary PhD Programmeen_US
dc.contributor.degreeDoctor of Philosophyen_US
dc.contributor.external-examinerDr. Shane Peggen_US
dc.contributor.graduate-coordinatorDr. Lynne Ronbinsonen_US
dc.contributor.thesis-readerDr. Jerome Singletonen_US
dc.contributor.thesis-readerDr. Marilyn Macdonalden_US
dc.contributor.thesis-supervisorDr. Jerome Barkowen_US
dc.contributor.ethics-approvalReceiveden_US
dc.contributor.manuscriptsNoen_US
dc.contributor.copyright-releaseNoen_US
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