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dc.contributor.authorFransen, Darren
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-13T14:13:58Z
dc.date.available2019-08-13T14:13:58Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10222/76246
dc.description.abstractThis thesis challenges our Western understanding of the sky by exploring the ethnoastronomy of the Mi’kmaq, Acadian, and Black Loyalist people of Nova Scotia, located along Canada’s Atlantic coast. It proposes four architectural pavilions, with three being located along Nova Scotia’s coast in culturally significant locations. As a result of light pollution, a complete understanding of the Mi’kmaq, Acadian, and Black loyalist ethnoastronomy cannot be achieved, resulting in a fourth shared pavilion in the dark sky preserve at Kejimkujik National Park. The construction of these proposed structures relies on traditional construction techniques as a means of knowledge presentation and preservation, to communicate a more complete cultural understanding unachievable with contemporary colonial museological strategies.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectEthnoastronomyen_US
dc.subjectCultural astronomyen_US
dc.subjectMi'kmaqen_US
dc.subjectAcadianen_US
dc.subjectBlack loyalistsen_US
dc.subjectNova Scotiaen_US
dc.subjectMicmac Indians
dc.titleReconnecting with the Sky: A Journey Through Nova Scotia's Cultural Landscapeen_US
dc.date.defence2019-07-02
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Architectureen_US
dc.contributor.degreeMaster of Architectureen_US
dc.contributor.external-examinerAnne Cormieren_US
dc.contributor.graduate-coordinatorStephen Parcellen_US
dc.contributor.thesis-readerNiall Savageen_US
dc.contributor.thesis-supervisorStephen Parcellen_US
dc.contributor.ethics-approvalNot Applicableen_US
dc.contributor.manuscriptsNot Applicableen_US
dc.contributor.copyright-releaseNot Applicableen_US
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