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dc.contributor.authorGlennie, Cassidy
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-05T11:21:53Z
dc.date.available2019-04-05T11:21:53Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10222/75429
dc.description.abstractHistorically, entertainment media have reproduced inaccurate and stereotypical media representations of Indigenous peoples. In this thesis, I draw on concepts such as Stuart Hall’s theory of media influence, Pierre Bourdieu’s concept of symbolic violence, George Gerbner and Gaye Tuchman’s ideas of symbolic annihilation in order to analyze how media representations of Indigenous women and girls perpetuate stereotypes, and how alternative media productions might counter them. Using ethnographic and participatory action research (PAR) methodologies, I then explore these issues using empirical material. First, I conduct an Ethnographic Content Analysis (ECA) to reveal how Indigenous women and girls are represented in music videos, identifying patterns along themes of beauty standards, stereotypes, and power and agency. Second, I explore how Inuit girls self-represented when given access to resources. To do this, I collaborated with local Indigenous organizations in Rankin Inlet, Nunavut, to facilitate a three-day music video camp for Inuit girls. A year later, following PAR principles, I involved the girls in the data analysis process; themes in the girls’ videos included friendship, connection to nature, Inuit culture and the importance of positive representation. Overall, this thesis provided an opportunity for raising awareness among the Inuit girls that by making their own media, they have the power to create their own self-representations and resist stereotypes. In this way, girl-led self-representations have the potential to change lives and communities.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectsociologyen_US
dc.subjectmedia studiesen_US
dc.subjectgirlhood studiesen_US
dc.subjectIndigenous studiesen_US
dc.subjectInuiten_US
dc.subjectvideoen_US
dc.titleINUIT GIRLS MAKE MEDIA: RESISTING STEREOTYPES THROUGH PARTICIPATORY ACTION RESEARCHen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.date.defence2019-04-02
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Sociology & Social Anthropologyen_US
dc.contributor.degreeMaster of Artsen_US
dc.contributor.external-examinern/aen_US
dc.contributor.graduate-coordinatorFiona Martinen_US
dc.contributor.thesis-readerDiana Lewisen_US
dc.contributor.thesis-readerElizabeth Fittingen_US
dc.contributor.thesis-supervisorMartha Radiceen_US
dc.contributor.ethics-approvalReceiveden_US
dc.contributor.manuscriptsNot Applicableen_US
dc.contributor.copyright-releaseNot Applicableen_US
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