Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMills, Janet
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-14T18:41:32Z
dc.date.available2018-12-14T18:41:32Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10222/75038
dc.descriptionIn this thesis I re-examine the Demerara slave rebellion of 1823, seeking to ascertain whether narratives by historians and others were correct in saying that all of the slaves on Demerara's East Coast had taken part. I reference historians Michael Nicolls', Jason Sharples', and Michael Johnson's work by emphasizing careful re-examination of primary sources for factual inconsistencies and potential white bias by the documents' writers and early interpreters. Primary sources show that interpretations which have not considered slaves' more complex, nuanced, and individual understandings of their situation and current events oversimplified slaves' lives and uprisings.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this thesis I re-examine primary documentation relating to the Demerara Rebellion of 1823. I engage in this exploration to ascertain whether previous narratives of the rebellion were correct in that all of the slaves on the East Coast of Demerara, numbering more than 9,000 in total, took part in an armed uprising against planters and British officials in an attempt to gain their freedom. I also consider, based on slaves’ demands for two or three days a week off for working on their own homes and provision grounds, the validity of some historians’ arguments that the Rebellion resembled a labour-related protest for better daily working conditions. According to my interpretation of the primary sources, I have concluded that both reasons for rebelling were present, and hinged upon individual slaves’ evaluation of a desirable or attainable outcome. I have also determined that there is no documented evidence to support a claim that all of the slaves rebelled, nor is the number of over 9,000 reasonable. It was, nevertheless, a large-scale uprising. Previous narratives, based primarily upon white fears, have underestimated the nuanced and sophisticated ways in which slaves considered the options available to them to better their lives.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectslaveryen_US
dc.subjectrebellionen_US
dc.subjectBritish Caribbeanen_US
dc.subjectAtlantic Worlden_US
dc.title"Quamina, do you hear this?" Revisiting the Demerara Slave Rebellion, 1823en_US
dc.date.defence2018-12-05
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Historyen_US
dc.contributor.degreeMaster of Artsen_US
dc.contributor.external-examinern/aen_US
dc.contributor.graduate-coordinatorColin Mitchellen_US
dc.contributor.thesis-readerPhilip Zachernuken_US
dc.contributor.thesis-readerJerry Bannisteren_US
dc.contributor.thesis-supervisorJustin Robertsen_US
dc.contributor.ethics-approvalNot Applicableen_US
dc.contributor.manuscriptsNot Applicableen_US
dc.contributor.copyright-releaseNot Applicableen_US
 Find Full text

Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record