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dc.contributor.authorMerrimen, Paul
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-31T17:21:33Z
dc.date.available2018-08-31T17:21:33Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10222/74196
dc.description.abstractThis thesis explores the spiritual arc of John Donne’s early lyric poetry through the lens of the Protestant Reformation. Drawing on the work of Max Weber, I situate Donne in a post-Reformed cultural environment with which his strenuous Catholic upbringing clashes, creating a rupture in consciousness from which a distinctive, though often paradoxical religious persona emerges. The decline of a particularly tactile sense of Catholic sacramentalism and the rise of a more transcendental Protestant mode of scriptural intercourse causes Donne to attempt a poetic synthesis of body and soul in order to reconcile the extremes of his own divided religious loyalties. Following a developmental trajectory from Donne’s earliest Elegies and Satires through the Songs and Sonnets and ending with a treatment of the Holy Sonnets, it will be shown that Donne forged a poetic via media between his own Catholic past and the growing Anglican consensus in early modern England.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectDonne, John, 1572-1631en_US
dc.subjectReformationen_US
dc.titleThe Body is His Book: John Donne’s Sacramental Poeticsen_US
dc.date.defence2018-08-31
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Englishen_US
dc.contributor.degreeMaster of Artsen_US
dc.contributor.external-examinern/aen_US
dc.contributor.graduate-coordinatorDr. Leonard Diepeveenen_US
dc.contributor.thesis-readerDr. Ronald Hueberten_US
dc.contributor.thesis-readerDr. Marjorie Stoneen_US
dc.contributor.thesis-supervisorDr. Christina Luckyjen_US
dc.contributor.ethics-approvalNot Applicableen_US
dc.contributor.manuscriptsNot Applicableen_US
dc.contributor.copyright-releaseNot Applicableen_US
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