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dc.contributor.authorCanning, Tonya
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-31T14:50:39Z
dc.date.available2018-08-31T14:50:39Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10222/74190
dc.descriptionEthnographic study of a failed Community Way local currency system in British Columbia, Canada, focusing on the experience of using local currency.en_US
dc.description.abstractLocal currencies are non-governmental monetary systems created to address particular economic, political, or social problems within a specific geographic area. They have a long history, exist in various forms, and have grown in popularity since the 1980s. Most recently they have been promoted as a strategy for economic localization and de-growth, preparing for climate change, and reducing social inequity. This ethnographic project draws on field study of various local currencies in British Columbia, Canada in 2012, focusing on the Columbia Basin Community Dollars system in Nelson. It considers local currencies’ capacity to spur social change by focusing on the subjective experience of using them. Despite Nelson seeming an ideal site for a successful local currency, Community Dollars were not widely adopted. In considering why, I detail Community Dollars’ development, the research context and its history, and the complicated Community Way currency model employed. The most significant issue in the Community Dollars system was pervasive tension between mainstream and countercultural values, a tension seen throughout the local currency movement. Using data from participant observation and interviews, and Bloch and Parry’s concept of transactional orders, I argue that most people will only use local currencies if they experience some direct benefit from doing so. National currencies have lower transaction costs, so outside of periods of financial crisis people receive few economic benefits from using local currency. The main benefit for those most likely to use local currency in stable economic situations is feeling they are improving social balance by enacting countercultural values and challenging the status quo. This study of a struggling local currency counterbalances literature emphasizing unusually successful local currency systems, provides insight into the lived experience of currency pluralism, and casts doubt on local currencies’ capacity to promote widespread social and economic change.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectLocal currencyen_US
dc.subjectNelson, British Columbiaen_US
dc.subjectCommunity Wayen_US
dc.subjectAlternative currencyen_US
dc.subjectCommunity currencyen_US
dc.subjectHeterodox economicsen_US
dc.subjectEconomic experimentationen_US
dc.subjectBritish Columbia, Canadaen_US
dc.subjectTransactional ordersen_US
dc.title“We Don’t Want Hippy Money”: Contradiction and Exchange in a Local Currency Systemen_US
dc.date.defence2018-08-23
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Sociology & Social Anthropologyen_US
dc.contributor.degreeDoctor of Philosophyen_US
dc.contributor.external-examinerDr. Susan Vincenten_US
dc.contributor.graduate-coordinatorDr. Fiona Martinen_US
dc.contributor.thesis-readerDr. Lindsay DuBoisen_US
dc.contributor.thesis-readerDr. Martha Radiceen_US
dc.contributor.thesis-supervisorDr. Leisl Gambolden_US
dc.contributor.ethics-approvalReceiveden_US
dc.contributor.manuscriptsNot Applicableen_US
dc.contributor.copyright-releaseNot Applicableen_US
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