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dc.contributor.authorPower, Kinnar
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-31T12:11:34Z
dc.date.available2018-08-31T12:11:34Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10222/74182
dc.descriptionA philosophical essay that interrogates the coherence and normative force of the work ethic-based conceptions of desert, in relation to contextual factors. It also offers an explanation for their persistence by demonstrating that they reflect relations of power and secure different loci of influence.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis essay argues against the idea that desert of a good life must be contingent on work. To do so, I document the increasing preeminence, over time, of conceptions of desert based solely in the work ethic. The idea that some people wilfully choose not to work due to moral perversity – and are thus undeserving of social assistance – stems from these conceptions. I argue that this position suffers from normative and logical weaknesses and is increasingly anachronistic in advanced post-industrial societies. If the scope of analysis is limited in this manner, and we assume that, in this context, goods and wealth are increasingly abundant, and redistributable without adverse economic consequences, while opportunities for employment are scarce – particularly during recessions – then the force of these ideas is considerably weakened. However, their persistence is explained not by their philosophical force, but rather by how they sustain the diffuse power relations endemic to market society.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectDistributive justiceen_US
dc.subjectGuaranteed incomeen_US
dc.subjectBasic incomeen_US
dc.subjectPolitical theoryen_US
dc.subjectTheories of Deserten_US
dc.titleIDLE, ABLE-BODIED AND UNDESERVING: THE PERSISTENCE OF UNDESERT IN WESTERN POLITICAL THOUGHTen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.date.defence2018-08-17
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Political Scienceen_US
dc.contributor.degreeMaster of Artsen_US
dc.contributor.external-examinerDr. Ruben Zaiottien_US
dc.contributor.graduate-coordinatorDr. Katherine Fierlbecken_US
dc.contributor.thesis-readerDr. Louise Carberten_US
dc.contributor.thesis-readerDr. Florian Bailen_US
dc.contributor.thesis-supervisorDr. Katherine Fierlbecken_US
dc.contributor.ethics-approvalNot Applicableen_US
dc.contributor.manuscriptsNot Applicableen_US
dc.contributor.copyright-releaseNot Applicableen_US
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