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dc.contributor.authorKekacs, Andrew
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-22T15:34:36Z
dc.date.available2017-08-22T15:34:36Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10222/73141
dc.description.abstractPrivate, non-industrial woodland owners provide more than half of the timber used by Nova Scotia’s forest-products industry. Research, however, suggests that many of these owners do not consider the income from timber sales to be their primary reason for owning woodland. This study aimed to reach a holistic understanding of their attitudes and motivations using walking interviews on the owners’ woodlands and a grounded theory approach to analysis. Forest landowners interviewed for this research were most concerned with the conservation – and ultimately the conveyance – of values that provide them with no immediate economic returns. The high value placed on these “gifts to a future world” offers a new way to think about the design of programs meant to encourage active management of private forestland.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectForest Landownersen_US
dc.subjectForest Stewardshipen_US
dc.subjectNova Scotia Forestsen_US
dc.subjectWoodland Ownersen_US
dc.subjectWalking Interviewsen_US
dc.titleGifts to a Future World: Conversations with Woodland Owners in Nova Scotiaen_US
dc.date.defence2017-08-01
dc.contributor.departmentSchool for Resource & Environmental Studiesen_US
dc.contributor.degreeMaster of Environmental Studiesen_US
dc.contributor.external-examinerDr. Thomas Beckleyen_US
dc.contributor.graduate-coordinatorDr. Kate Sherrenen_US
dc.contributor.thesis-readerDr. Kate Sherrenen_US
dc.contributor.thesis-readerLauranne Sandersonen_US
dc.contributor.thesis-supervisorDr. Peter Duinkeren_US
dc.contributor.ethics-approvalReceiveden_US
dc.contributor.manuscriptsNoen_US
dc.contributor.copyright-releaseNoen_US
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