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dc.contributor.authorChayer, Kim
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-21T18:05:43Z
dc.date.available2017-08-21T18:05:43Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10222/73130
dc.description.abstractIn response to a growing trend of single-occupancy living in Western societies amidst social situations that can be isolating (i.e. aging of the population, prolongation of early adult years, immigration), this thesis investigates an alternative minimal housing complex typology. Crossprogramming is used to counteract isolation by initiating social interaction between two potentially alienated groups and their neighbours. The typology developed is tested on Quinpool road in Halifax, Nova Scotia, and is intended for students from away (i.e. international and out of province) and retirees from Nova Scotia. The thesis proposes a multigenerational housing complex supplemented by multiple programmed spaces, some intended for shared use between the residents and others for the neighborhood at large.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectExistenzminimumen_US
dc.subjectCrossprogrammingen_US
dc.subjectMixed-use Residentialen_US
dc.titleExcess of the Minimum: Revisiting Existenzminimum Through Crossprogramming in Halifaxen_US
dc.date.defence2017-06-26
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Architectureen_US
dc.contributor.degreeMaster of Architectureen_US
dc.contributor.external-examinerAnne Cormieren_US
dc.contributor.graduate-coordinatorSteve Parcellen_US
dc.contributor.thesis-readerChristine Macyen_US
dc.contributor.thesis-supervisorSarah Bonnemaisonen_US
dc.contributor.ethics-approvalNot Applicableen_US
dc.contributor.manuscriptsNot Applicableen_US
dc.contributor.copyright-releaseNot Applicableen_US
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