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dc.contributor.authorDoria, Nicole
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-16T14:25:11Z
dc.date.available2017-08-16T14:25:11Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10222/73109
dc.description.abstractEating disorders are a public health issue in Canada where between 600,000 and 990,000 Canadians currently meet the diagnostic criteria for a clinical eating disorder; 80% of these Canadians are females. Of concern are female athletes that participate in aesthetic sports, such as dance, as they are a high-risk group for developing clinical eating disorders. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of female dancers in the world of dance and examine how these experiences shaped their relationship with food and body. Feminist poststructuralism guided by discourse analysis was used to enable a critical understanding of this relationship. Environment, parents, coaches and peers emerged as the largest influencers in shaping the dancers’ relationship with food and body. This study provides knowledge for guiding health promotion initiatives and prevention efforts aimed at supporting change in the culture of dance to reduce (ED)Bs in female dancers.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleDANCING IN A CULTURE OF DISORDERED EATING: A FEMINIST POSTSTRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF YOUNG GIRLS’ EXPERIENCES IN THE WORLD OF DANCEen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.date.defence2017-07-24
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Health & Human Performanceen_US
dc.contributor.degreeMaster of Artsen_US
dc.contributor.external-examinerMegan Astonen_US
dc.contributor.graduate-coordinatorJacqueline Gahaganen_US
dc.contributor.thesis-readerSara Kirken_US
dc.contributor.thesis-readerLois Jacksonen_US
dc.contributor.thesis-supervisorMatthew Numeren_US
dc.contributor.ethics-approvalReceiveden_US
dc.contributor.manuscriptsNot Applicableen_US
dc.contributor.copyright-releaseNot Applicableen_US
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