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dc.contributor.authorDeter, Sarabeth
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-08T12:43:54Z
dc.date.available2017-08-08T12:43:54Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10222/73095
dc.description.abstractThis thesis addresses light pollution, specifically over-illumination, in cities. It examines the history of artificial lighting, the consequences of excessive light, and the motivations for its continued overuse: fear and normalization. My critique is aimed at urban design and architecture that does little to address the night, exacerbating our dependence on artificial light. The experiment investigates how the integration of minimal artificial light and architecture might alleviate our discomfort with the dark through the design of a city block. Drawing from the study of visual perception, principles were developed to assist in the design of nighttime environments in which we not only feel at ease, but that we embrace, thereby reducing both the need for and the amount of artificial light at night.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectartificial lighten_US
dc.subjectperceptionen_US
dc.subjectlight pollutionen_US
dc.subjectnighten_US
dc.subjectarchitectureen_US
dc.titleDimming the Cityen_US
dc.date.defence2017-06-26
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Architectureen_US
dc.contributor.degreeMaster of Architectureen_US
dc.contributor.external-examinerAndrea Kahnen_US
dc.contributor.graduate-coordinatorStephen Parcellen_US
dc.contributor.thesis-readerStephen Parcellen_US
dc.contributor.thesis-supervisorCristina Verissimoen_US
dc.contributor.ethics-approvalNot Applicableen_US
dc.contributor.manuscriptsNot Applicableen_US
dc.contributor.copyright-releaseNot Applicableen_US
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