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dc.contributor.authorGriffiths, Ann Lynn.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-21T12:37:27Z
dc.date.available2014-10-21T12:37:27Z
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.identifier.otherAAINQ36553en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10222/55563
dc.descriptionIn the 1990s, there is no one defining vision of democracy---it has evolved both across time and space. The different versions of democracy are related to different theoretical visions of the phenomenon. How one defines democracy influences what steps one advocates in a process of democratization. This thesis postulates that there are two broad approaches to democratization. The two approaches are referred to here as the horizontal approach, which stresses the creation of linkages among citizens in democratization, and the vertical approach, which stresses the creation of the liberal elements of a liberal-democratic society. This thesis argues that between the two approaches there are three elements which should be present in a democratization policy toward Eastern Europe: (1) building democratic institutions; (2) facilitating economic transformation; (3) and creating democratic civil societies.en_US
dc.descriptionCanada has not historically been involved with either Eastern Europe or democratization. The Cold War prohibited free interaction between East and West, and in the South, democratization was defined as the interdiction of communism. Starting in the mid-1960s, this began to change. Canada began to incorporate considerations of human rights and democracy into its policy (although not always its practice) towards the South. When the Berlin Wall fell in 1989, it provided a glorious opportunity for Canada to apply what it had learned in its democratization policy in the South. It has not done this. This thesis argues that Canadian policy has focused on only two of the three elements---building democratic institutions and facilitating economic transformation---to the virtual exclusion of the third---creating democratic civil societies. Both the reasons for this, and its implications for the future of democracy in Eastern Europe, are unclear.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Dalhousie University (Canada), 1998.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherDalhousie Universityen_US
dc.publisheren_US
dc.subjectHistory, Modern.en_US
dc.subjectPolitical Science, General.en_US
dc.subjectPolitical Science, International Law and Relations.en_US
dc.titleCreating sustainable democracy? Canadian policy in the Visegrad countries in the post-Cold War period.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.contributor.degreePh.D.en_US
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