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dc.contributor.authorTyndall, Paul.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-21T12:36:30Z
dc.date.available2014-10-21T12:36:30Z
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.identifier.otherAAINN93801en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10222/55420
dc.descriptionIn his few brief comments on his poetry, Yvor Winters provided a compelling account of his development as a poet, one which has been adopted and elaborated upon by subsequent commentators. While this account is both detailed and insightful, it does not tell the whole story of his development. In fact, it leaves unanswered several important questions about why his poetic career assumed the shape it did. For instance, it does not explain his sudden rejection in the late 1920s of free verse in favor of traditional meters and forms. Nor does it address the striking thematic continuities that exist in his poetry long after this change of direction. Finally, Winters' own account of his development does not adequately address the criticism that his poetry suffered from his adherence to a strict formalist poetic. This thesis examines the internal dynamics of Winters' poetic career by focusing on precisely those questions which Winters' own account of his development leaves unanswered.en_US
dc.descriptionThe aim of this project is to define Winters' career as the product not only of authorial intention, reason, and will but of several other determining factors as well. The introduction is devoted to a general discussion of the need for a revisionary reading of Winters' poetry, and to a summary of recent theoretical discussions of the concept of the literary career itself. Chapter One examines winters' comments on his poetry in order to reveal both their insights and their limitations. In Chapter Two, his sudden rejection of free verse is related to his problematic encounter with modernism, while in Chapter Three, his adoption of traditional meters and forms is seen as the consequence of an intellectual conversion which Winters experienced during the late '20s and early '30s. Chapter Four focuses on the ideology of the social and the political poems which Winters wrote in the '30s and '40s, while Chapter Five addresses the claim that Winters' formalism hindered his development as a poet. The conclusion summarizes the findings of this investigation into the internal dynamics of Winters' poetic career.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Dalhousie University (Canada), 1994.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherDalhousie Universityen_US
dc.publisheren_US
dc.subjectLiterature, Modern.en_US
dc.subjectBiography.en_US
dc.subjectLiterature, American.en_US
dc.titleThe limits of judgment: On the shape of Yvor Winters' poetic career.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.contributor.degreePh.D.en_US
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