Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMunavvar, Mohamed.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-21T12:33:28Z
dc.date.available2014-10-21T12:33:28Z
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.identifier.otherAAINN93712en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10222/55390
dc.descriptionThe United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, 1982, (LOSC) has legitimized ocean states. Ocean states are archipelagic states within which their archipelago constitutes the total state territory.en_US
dc.descriptionThe development of a new concept in the international law of the sea, which created ocean states was necessary as traditional international law, which was mainly concerned with continental or land-based states, could not be properly applied to states which consisted of archipelagos. The geographic, economic, social, political and environmental circumstances of ocean states, therefore, require a more realistic definition of their territory. Such definition must also conform to the public perception of ocean states, formed through a lengthy process of interaction between the inhabitants of the state and their surrounding waters and inter-connecting islands. Accordingly, the archipelagic concept in the modern law of the sea has created an entirely new, yet eminently functional method of acquisition of territory in international law.en_US
dc.descriptionNevertheless the archipelagic concept must not be viewed simply in terms of expanded coastal jurisdiction by certain states, but as a practical as well as functional basis for the determination of the territorial limits of such "ocean" states. In other words, the waters inter-connecting the islands of the archipelago are a constituent part of the territory of the archipelagic state. Furthermore, in the case of many smaller ocean states, their ocean areas are of greater importance than their land territory.en_US
dc.descriptionAlthough size, nature and requirements of the various ocean states differ greatly, the archipelagic concept provides the necessary territorial basis for their national unity, independence and integrity. Host critically, the new concept also determines the essential basis of such ocean states' sustainable development.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (J.S.D.)--Dalhousie University (Canada), 1993.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherDalhousie Universityen_US
dc.publisheren_US
dc.subjectLaw.en_US
dc.subjectPolitical Science, International Law and Relations.en_US
dc.titleOcean states: Archipelagic regimes in the Law of the Sea.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.contributor.degreeJ.S.D.en_US
 Find Full text

Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record