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dc.contributor.authorFenety, Patricia Anne.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-21T12:36:53Z
dc.date.available2014-10-21T12:36:53Z
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.identifier.otherAAINN05267en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10222/55062
dc.descriptionSeated subjects move (i.e. fidget) in reaction to prolonged, fixed postures. The hypothesis that this seated movement correlates with perceived discomfort (PD) has not been rigorously tested. The purpose of my doctoral research was to measure in-chair movement (ICM) as an objective correlate of sitting discomfort and examine the effect of workplace factors and ergonomic interventions on ICM and PD in an on-site study of healthy, computer-based telephone operators. I measured ICM by tracking the center of pressure (COP) at the buttock-chair interface with an interface pressure mat. Perceived exertion, workload, and PD were measured with validated rating scales. Data were tested ($\alpha$ =.05) with repeated measures MANOVA, regression analysis, and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). My thesis consists of five studies. In study number one, a significant correlation between the interface pressure mat and the force platform was shown for the tracking of COP coordinates on both axes. Next, I established the inter-trial reliability (ICC $>$.90) of both the COP system and the PD scale. In my third study, I found that PD was significantly related to the time-of-day and work pace, while ICM was affected only by work pace. In study four, I showed the following significant effects with short term use of workstation exercises: increased ICM and decreased PD and perceived exertion. In my final study, I found that--compared to a fixed (tilt and lock seatpan) chair--use of a dynamic (freely tilting) ergonomic chair increased both ICM and sitting comfort. In summary, my results show that movement in reaction to prolonged seated work is related to discomfort. By contrast, movement that was allowed by a decrease in work pace, or promoted by the use of exercises or a dynamic chair was related to improved comfort. Given the positive relationship between sitting discomfort and future musculoskeletal problems, these results have important implications in ergonomics and health care.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Dalhousie University (Canada), 1995.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherDalhousie Universityen_US
dc.publisheren_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Occupational Health and Safety.en_US
dc.titleFactors influencing sitting comfort and in-chair movement in the office environment.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.contributor.degreePh.D.en_US
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