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dc.contributor.authorValdivia, Ivan.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-21T12:36:38Z
dc.date.available2014-10-21T12:36:38Z
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.otherAAINR16705en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10222/54797
dc.descriptionVulnerability is an important consideration in traumatology. Recent reviews have noted the need for both longitudinal research and predictive models that combine proximal and distal factors. The present two studies aimed to address these concerns by introducing Dependency & Self-Criticism (distal personality factors) and emotional expression and social support (proximal behavioral factors) in the prediction of PTSD symptoms. Using a sample of introductory psychology students (N = 444), Study 1 attempted to: (1) determine the frequency of various traumatic events, and (2) predict symptoms and functioning using a novel set of vulnerability personality factors. Study 2 (N=109) (using both paper and pencil and interview techniques) complimented Study 1 by adding a longitudinal component to test whether people who have been sexually assaulted experienced more pathological symptoms over time than did a group of people who had not been sexually assaulted. The second study tested whether Dependency and Self-Criticism interacted with, or were mediated by, social support and emotional expression. Overall, it was found (1) that Self-Criticism plays an important role in the prediction of PTSD symptoms over and above dysphoria and number of traumatic events, (2) that participants in the sexual assault group were diagnosed more frequently with anxiety disorders than were participants in the comparison group (despite no differences on the continuous measures), (3) that Self-Criticism, Dependency, and the number of traumatic events interacted in the prediction of PTSD symptoms, and (4) that Dependency's relationship with PTSD symptoms, rather than Self-Criticism as predicted, was partially mediated by emotional expression and social support. Despite Dependency's ability to predict PTSD symptoms, Self-Criticism's role was more robust. Limitations and implications of the studies' finding are discussed.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Dalhousie University (Canada), 2006.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherDalhousie Universityen_US
dc.publisheren_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Clinical.en_US
dc.titleVulnerability to traumatic events: Dependency and self-criticism.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.contributor.degreePh.D.en_US
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