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dc.contributor.authorGrant, J. Andrew.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-21T12:36:25Z
dc.date.available2014-10-21T12:36:25Z
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.otherAAINR08395en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10222/54724
dc.descriptionThe doctoral thesis, Global Governance and the Kimberley Process: The Case of Conflict Diamonds and Sierra Leone, assesses the ongoing global governance efforts on conflict diamonds and the attendant prospects for improving human security in Sierra Leone. The thesis contends that the 'Kimberley Process' is a promising example of an emerging form of global governance, as it seeks to impose strict verification and trade controls on diamonds through the collaboration of not only state actors, but also non-state actors such as diamond firms and industry associations as well as non-governmental organisations (NGOs). Since 2000, this diverse set of actors has accomplished much in the way of regulating the global diamond industry and eradicating the trade of conflict diamonds.en_US
dc.descriptionFirst, the thesis analyses how new forms of global governance comprised of networks of mixed-actor coalitions and partnerships of state and non-state actors at the global, regional, national, and local levels become a means to promote human security and influence international and national policy-making processes despite numerous obstacles. While still important in this era of emerging global governance, states and international organisations are no longer the sole players but rather are joined by various non-state actors in diverse forms of mixed-actor coalitions. Second, the thesis highlights the porosity of international borders in the context of insurgency and criminal activity. Illicit diamond mining may take place away from the scrutiny of government mines monitors, and even legally-mined diamonds may be smuggled across state borders with relative ease. Thus, the mineral is an attractive medium of exchange for insurgency movements as well as transnational and local crime networks. The research reveals that despite recent advances in regulation, diamond revenues have not resulted in envisioned human security gains in most African countries, including Sierra Leone. Illicit diamond mining and diamond smuggling contribute to regional instability, deter foreign investment, and divert funds that would otherwise be added to government revenues.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Dalhousie University (Canada), 2006.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherDalhousie Universityen_US
dc.publisheren_US
dc.subjectPolitical Science, International Law and Relations.en_US
dc.titleGlobal governance and the Kimberley Process: The case of conflict diamonds and Sierra Leone.en_US
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dc.contributor.degreePh.D.en_US
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