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dc.contributor.authorKlaz, Stanislav
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-04T11:41:11Z
dc.date.available2018-04-04T11:41:11Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10222/73817
dc.description.abstractThe thesis examines the effects of depopulation in Canso, Nova Scotia and articulates a response to the challenges of building in a socially and economically precarious community. In examining the fluxuations in historical population and economy it is concluded that Canso is not on an inevitably downward trajectory. Rather, it is a historically resilient community which has gone through many cycles of growth and decline. The population of Canso is aging which presents an immediate need for elderly housing. This program is used as the catalyst for any number of future programmatic uses accommodated by an architectural framework designed for adaptation and disassembly. The historical continuity of this inconstant architecture is articulated by the intersection of building and landscape, creating a ruin which is both a record of the building in time and the inspiration for possible future development.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectadaptable architectureen_US
dc.subjectrural declineen_US
dc.subjecttime-based designen_US
dc.subjectNova Scotiaen_US
dc.subjectCanso (N.S.)en_US
dc.titleThe Polyvalent Ruin: Reconciling Time and Place in Rural Nova Scotiaen_US
dc.date.defence2017-06-26
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Architectureen_US
dc.contributor.degreeMaster of Architectureen_US
dc.contributor.external-examinerAndrea Kahnen_US
dc.contributor.graduate-coordinatorSteve Parcellen_US
dc.contributor.thesis-readerFrank Palermoen_US
dc.contributor.thesis-supervisorEmanuel Jannaschen_US
dc.contributor.ethics-approvalNot Applicableen_US
dc.contributor.manuscriptsNot Applicableen_US
dc.contributor.copyright-releaseNot Applicableen_US
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