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dc.contributor.authorEvans, Joan Alice.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-21T12:35:08Z
dc.date.available2014-10-21T12:35:08Z
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.identifier.otherAAINQ66632en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10222/55759
dc.descriptionMen's experience in the nursing profession is profoundly shaped by notions of masculinity and gender---notions which constitute a pervasive factor in structuring different work lives and unequal opportunities for women nurses and men nurses. The importance of gender as a fundamental and organizing factor of daily life is evidenced by the stigma of homosexuality or spoiled masculinity which is associated with men who defy prevailing gender norms. For men nurses, gender norms and gender inequality also interact with group proportions to create unique patterns of interaction that create complex and contradictory situations of advantage and disadvantage. These patterns of interaction which are played out in nurses' socialization and caring practices and in the work roles and tasks they assume, reflect the ways in which men nurses' and women nurses' practices support hegemonic masculinity and relations of dominance and oppression. Such practices are not without a price. Men nurses pay for their status and privilege in terms of isolation, hostility and rejection by women colleagues. Women nurses pay by engaging in practices that reinforce their own subjugated status.en_US
dc.descriptionThe methodology used to explore the multiplicity and diversity of men nurses' experiences was based on postmodernist, feminist and masculinity theory. Data gathered in interviews with eight men nurses were analyzed for themes which captured the complexity of gender relations among men nurses and between men nurses, women nurses and men physicians. For men nurses, the struggle to maintain hegemonic masculinity has major implications for all nurses and the profession in general. Men as men are not a disadvantaged group in patriarchal culture. The work in nursing then is not to redress a gender disadvantage from which they suffer, but to explicate gender practices that structure unequal opportunities for women nurses and men nurses to the detriment of all.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Dalhousie University (Canada), 2001.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherDalhousie Universityen_US
dc.publisheren_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Nursing.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Industrial.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, General.en_US
dc.titleMen nurses and masculinities: Exploring gendered and sexed relations in nursing.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.contributor.degreePh.D.en_US
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