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dc.contributor.authorWoldu, Tadesse Abadi.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-21T12:36:57Z
dc.date.available2014-10-21T12:36:57Z
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.identifier.otherAAINN87507en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10222/55371
dc.descriptionThe main thrust of this set of studies is an attempt at understanding the general features of developing economies, with reference to Argentina, that need to be taken into account whenever major macroeconomic decisions, including stabilization programs, are to be undertaken. It assesses the role of devaluation in a stabilization program in the Argentine context (1976-82). The study also deals with the possible existence of sectoral disequilibrium in the Argentine importable goods sector as a result of policy implemented barriers to trade and capital flows and the macroeconomic effects of changes in these barriers. An attempt is also made at surveying the various sectors of the Argentine economy and the structural rigidities/flexibilities that are inherent in them with the hope of exposing each sector's contributions to the inflationary tendencies that have consistently thwarted stabilization attempts by different administrations.en_US
dc.descriptionThe results of the three studies and the conclusions arrived at may be summarized here. There has been quite an array of factors that contributed to relatively high rates of inflation and balance of payments problems the country has had to face. This set of studies indicates that expenditure-switching policies, such as devaluation, can affect export earnings only through induced increases in supply. This in turn calls for the elimination of rigidities in supply so that demand restraint will be smoothly reflected in the moderation of inflationary pressures and a redirection of resources toward the external sector. It also appears that the various stabilization attempts and the measures taken to this effect may have had a significant impact in at least narrowing the gap between demand and supply in the importable goods sector. The results of the third study confirm the structuralist and cost-push pricing hypothesis in explaining the inflationary experience of Argentina. The results also indicate that supply rigidity in the nontradable goods sector was significant.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Dalhousie University (Canada), 1993.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherDalhousie Universityen_US
dc.publisheren_US
dc.subjectEconomics, General.en_US
dc.titleThree essays on inflation and stabilization in Argentina: 1976--1988.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.contributor.degreePh.D.en_US
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