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dc.contributor.authorPatterson, Robin L.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-21T12:36:37Z
dc.date.available2014-10-21T12:36:37Z
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.otherAAINR16702en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10222/54795
dc.descriptionThis theoretical framework defines and examines whether adolescent alienation is a multidimensional construct comprised of "psychological components" and "contextual domains". It was hypothesized that alienation is comprised of four "psychological components" which are: (a) being alone, not spending time with others, being abandoned and isolated, (b) being a target, the occurrence of being made fun of and teased by others, (c) not fitting-in, being disliked, seen as different, or uninteresting by others, and (d) being cut-off, the occurrence of being ignored, rejected, or excluded by others. It was also hypothesized that alienation is experienced in four "contextual domains" which are people at school, friends, boyfriend/girlfriend, and family. It was examined whether both "psychological components" and "contextual domains" are relevant and the extents to which "psychological components" are specified within "contextual domains" or visa versa.en_US
dc.descriptionThe proposed framework of alienation was examined by developing and testing the psychometric properties of a new scale, the Adolescent Alienation Questionnaire (AAQ. Two studies were conducted with three primary objectives, namely to examine the (a) structure of alienation, (b) stability of alienation, and (c) impact of alienation on various mental health outcomes. Study 1 consisted of 1870 adolescents at Time 1 (Study 1A) and 1780 adolescents at Time 2 (Study 1B) from which data were collected approximately one year apart. Study 2 was comprised of three groups of adolescents, 31 adolescents who were distressed, 35 adolescents who previously self-harmed, and 35 comparison adolescents, who were followed each month for one year. Study 1 showed that the structure of adolescent alienation was supported. Stability of alienation was shown by good test-retest reliability. Results from Study 2 showed additional support for the structure and stability of alienation. It was shown that alienation was related to mental health outcomes (depressed mood, hopelessness, stress, and self-harm behaviours). It was also shown that adolescents who were distressed or previously self-harmed felt more alienated than the comparison adolescents. Two mediation models supported the sequence of alienation. The proposed theoretical framework of adolescent alienation was supported, stability for the AAQ was shown, and evidence was provided for the impact of alienation.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Dalhousie University (Canada), 2006.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherDalhousie Universityen_US
dc.publisheren_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Clinical.en_US
dc.titleAdolescent alienation: Examining the relevance of contextual domains and psychological components.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.contributor.degreePh.D.en_US
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