Now showing items 1-5 of 5

  • CRASH: Metafisica dell'ubiquità  

    Fattori, Adolfo (Dalhousie University. Electronic Text Centre, 2003)
    The culture of the twentieth century is characterized by three industrial products: the cinema, the car and science-fiction. All three relate to the way we experience time and space. In his novel Crash, J.G. Ballard uses ...
  • La Planète Mars dans les romans de science-fiction anglo-saxons des années 1990: La Peur du monstre de pierre 

    Villers, Aurelie (Dalhousie University. Electronic Text Centre, 2004)
    When it deals with the planet Mars, nineteen-nineties science-fiction faces an alternative: either the heroes adapt to Mars' hard conditions (and that's "pantropy"), or they adapt Mars to make it livable for human beings ...
  • Literary Speculations: Postmodern Dystopia and the Future of Books 

    Corrie, Emily P (2012-08-30)
    This thesis identifies a trend in recent postmodern dystopian fiction for writers to metafictionally dwell on the place of literature in a future context. This trend springs from similar concerns present in the two most ...
  • Psychological Terror and Social Fears in Philip K. Dick's Science Fiction 

    Bettanin, Giuliano (Dalhousie University. Electronic Text Centre, 2004)
    Science-fiction and horror are closely related genres, both belonging to the larger domain of fantastic literature. They share a partly common history. This article aims to examine how Philip K. Dick, one of the most ...
  • Robot géant: De l'instrumentalisation à  la fusion 

    Suvilay, Bounthavy (Dalhousie University. Electronic Text Centre, 2004)
    Through the history of a sub-genre of science-fiction (cartoons featuring giant robots), this article attempts to identify how the robot switches roles, going from simple instrument to essential part of the plot. The various ...