Now showing items 1-6 of 6

  • CRASH: Metafisica dell'ubiquità  

    Fattori, Adolfo (Dalhousie University. Electronic Text Centre, 2003)
    The culture of the twentieth century is characterized by three industrial products: the cinema, the car and science-fiction. All three relate to the way we experience time and space. In his novel Crash, J.G. Ballard uses ...
  • Il Corsaro Nero e Il Capitano Blood: Una lettura comparata di alcuni lavori di Emilio Salgari e di Rafael Sabatini 

    Torri, Michelguglielmo (Dalhousie University. Electronic Text Centre, 2002)
    This article compares Emilio Salgari's novel Il Corsaro Nero and Rafael Sabatini's novel Captain Blood. Both stories share the same time-frame (the mid seventeenth-century) and the same geographical location (the Caribbean ...
  • La Terreur des 'Maîtres du temps' fantastiques 

    Dufayet, Nathalie (Dalhousie University. Electronic Text Centre, 2004)
    Forever concerned with objectivity, the 19th century opens the era of triumphant positivism. All sciences, from physics to history, will therefore deal exclusively with facts, their analysis and the links between them. ...
  • Lily et James Potter, ou les visages morcelés de l'unité perdue 

    Cani, Isabelle (Dalhousie University. Electronic Text Centre, 2006)
    In Harry Potter, the multiplicity of secondary characters supports the hero's identity quest and mirrors the tight logic of J. K. Rowling's universe. First of all, one must go beyond the superficial opposition between ...
  • "To talk (why?) with mute ash": Models of mourning in Anne Carson's elegies 

    Lewis, Catherine
    The model for human desire that classicist and poet Anne Carson lays out in Eros the Bittersweet also serves as a model for the state of mourning—a state in which her speakers exist in elegies “Appendix to Ordinary Time” ...
  • Un Souvenir d'enfance de J. R. R. Tolkien 

    Thibault, Franck (Dalhousie University. Electronic Text Centre, 2004)
    Tolkien's work is home to many terrifying monsters. The spider is one of its most peculiar. It is constantly present in his novels and undergoes changes in its role and function. Tolkien does not use the spider simply to ...