Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorAllen, Janice
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-02T16:02:41Z
dc.date.available2016-09-02T16:02:41Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10222/72196
dc.description.abstractThis thesis applies finite element numerical modeling to a range of projects investigating salt tectonics at rifted continental margins. Both two-dimensional and fully three-dimensional models are used. The first project demonstrates that incorrect density scaling in physical analogue models of salt tectonics leads to: 1) overestimated buoyancy force and 2) underestimated pressure gradient and sediment strength. Numerical models (2D) show a shift in salt structures, from diapir-minibasin pairs to expulsion rollover, when density scaling errors are corrected. The second and third projects use 2D nested models, which allow for dynamic evolution of the continental margin scale system while providing high resolution visualization of salt basins, to study the interactions among syn-rift salt deposition and deformation, post-salt sedimentation, and ongoing rifting tectonics. This work makes the important advancement of allowing salt basin geometry to evolve dynamically. The second project considers intermediate width margins, and shows that the timing of salt deposition relative to rifting (early syn-rift vs late syn-rift salt) leads to distinct patterns of salt distribution and deformation. Key features of salt tectonics at the Central Red Sea are captured using a layered salt succession deposited in the mid to late syn-rift period. The third project considers wide continental margins, developed from weak continental crust. In addition to studying syn-rift salt tectonics, the impact of sedimentation on the style of rifting is investigated. A comparison is made to the central and northern Nova Scotia margin. The final project presents preliminary results from a fully 3D numerical modeling study of the formation of minibasins through uneven sediment loading over salt. This work compares the evolution of 2D-equivalent and fully 3D model designs, exploring the importance of studying even simple salt tectonic systems using a fully 3D approach.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectsalten_US
dc.subjectsalt tectonicsen_US
dc.subjectrifted marginen_US
dc.subjectconjugate marginen_US
dc.subjectnumerical modelingen_US
dc.titleNumerical Modeling of Salt Tectonics at Rifted Continental Marginsen_US
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.defence2016-06-13
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Earth Sciencesen_US
dc.contributor.degreeDoctor of Philosophyen_US
dc.contributor.external-examinerJurgen Adamen_US
dc.contributor.graduate-coordinatorJohn Gosseen_US
dc.contributor.thesis-readerDavid Whippen_US
dc.contributor.thesis-readerGrant Wachen_US
dc.contributor.thesis-readerMark Deptucken_US
dc.contributor.thesis-supervisorNick Culshawen_US
dc.contributor.ethics-approvalNot Applicableen_US
dc.contributor.manuscriptsYesen_US
dc.contributor.copyright-releaseYesen_US
 Find Full text

Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record