Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorShipley, Brian C.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-21T12:38:24Z
dc.date.available2014-10-21T12:38:24Z
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.otherAAINR27185en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10222/54890
dc.descriptionThis dissertation reexamines William E. Logan's pioneering geological survey of the colonial province of Canada, 1842-1869, inspired by new historical perspectives on science, geography, exploration, cartography, gender, the body, and state formation. I begin with the rapid development of geological surveying and mapping in 1830s Britain, and locate Logan in two key worlds: the gentlemanly scientific circles of metropolitan London and the coal fields of industrial South Wales.en_US
dc.descriptionThe second section addresses the problem of fieldwork in an unfamiliar environment, examining Logan's importation and adaptation of British scientific practices to his explorations of the Gaspe peninsula in the early 1840s. Here I analyze the physical and sensory experiences of the surveyor and his white and Native assistants as they struggled to measure and classify colonial territory. I interpret Logan's exploration narratives---his personal field diaries---to show how his British-Canadian field experience shaped his masculine approach to geological surveying. Equally importantly, Logan's personal example created a distinct and enduring field geologist identity in the culture of Canadian science.en_US
dc.descriptionThe last chapters turn to the transformation of field experience into facts, through the mediums of industrial exhibitions, museum displays, printed reports, and geological maps. This shift of frame, linked to the previous theme by the central role of Logan himself, addresses the question of how knowledge circulates from the small, locally-specific spaces in which it is produced to the broader realm of public discourse. Thus, visitors to London and Paris exhibitions, or to the geological museum in Montreal, could examine carefully-labelled fossil and mineral specimens while viewing a detailed, colour-coded map laying out the subterranean potential of Canadian territory.en_US
dc.descriptionSo deployed, these geological facts also had economic and political implications: Logan's industrially-arranged mineral collections reinforced imperial ideas about colonial development, while his testimony on the economic potential of northern regions helped to support agricultural settlement plans, contributing to the expansion of the state into Native-populated areas. Finally and most generally, Logan's geology led to a new conception of Canadian geography in terms of "Laurentian" rocks, later known as the Canadian Shield.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--Dalhousie University (Canada), 2007.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherDalhousie Universityen_US
dc.publisheren_US
dc.subjectBiography.en_US
dc.subjectHistory, Canadian.en_US
dc.subjectPhysical Geography.en_US
dc.subjectHistory of Science.en_US
dc.titleFrom field to fact: William E. Logan and the geological survey of Canada.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.contributor.degreePh.D.en_US
 Find Full text

Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record