Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorThompson, Ben
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-13T10:57:45Z
dc.date.available2018-04-13T10:57:45Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10222/73868
dc.descriptionThis thesis describes the development of a concept for re-purposing electric vehicle batteries for grid energy storage, and accompanying experimental research validating and characterizing the performance of a set of example batteries.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn the face of the global transition away from fossil fuels, the electricity grid faces many challenges. The growth of renewable energy requires investment in new methods of matching supply and demand with intermittent resources. Energy storage has become a leading technology to meet this challenge. At the same time, electric vehicles are taking to the world’s roads, with 2 million plug-in vehicles in cumulative sales this year. Once their automotive life is completed, the batteries may still be useful for other purposes. Used electric vehicle batteries may be re-purposed for grid electricity storage. Batteries from different manufacturers and use history may be aggregated to optimally draw on the locally available supply of used batteries. A mixed battery array concept is created for a new implementation, along with a list of priority research topics. Five EV batteries are tested according to PNNL suggested protocols, to determine their relative performance. It is found that EV batteries can provide grid services including peak shaving and frequency regulation. In deepdischarge constant-power cycling, energy capacities were within 10% of nominal rated values, with DC energy efficiency between 95-98%, at a 4 hour discharge rate. When increased to a 0.5 hour rate, energy capacity reduced to 50-70% of nominal, and energy efficiency reduced to 85- 95%. When providing frequency regulation services, all batteries reached an apparent limit near a power bid factor equivalent to a 0.5 hour rate. Cooling performance was best with parallel liquid cooling, then parallel forced-air cooling, then series liquid cooling, then passive cooling. Liquid cooling vs. air cooling was not a strong indicator of cooling ability, rather series vs. parallel configuration was the dominant factor. The conclusion drawn from testing is that second-life batteries are technically viable for re-purposing. A performance ranking was created to assist in selecting batteries to provide grid services.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectElectric Vehiclesen_US
dc.subjectBatteriesen_US
dc.subjectSecond-Lifeen_US
dc.subjectEnergy Storageen_US
dc.titleRepurposing Electric Vehicle Batteries in a Mixed Array for Grid Storageen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.date.defence2018-03-29
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Mechanical Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.degreeMaster of Applied Scienceen_US
dc.contributor.external-examinern/aen_US
dc.contributor.graduate-coordinatorDr. Dominic Groulxen_US
dc.contributor.thesis-readerDr. Dominic Groulxen_US
dc.contributor.thesis-readerDr. Timothy Littleen_US
dc.contributor.thesis-supervisorDr. Lukas Swanen_US
dc.contributor.ethics-approvalNot Applicableen_US
dc.contributor.manuscriptsNot Applicableen_US
dc.contributor.copyright-releaseNot Applicableen_US
 Find Full text

Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record