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dc.contributor.authorBarbour, Tammy
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-05T12:22:10Z
dc.date.available2017-09-05T12:22:10Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10222/73293
dc.descriptionThe purpose of this qualitative, exploratory research study is to obtain community knowledge and understanding of the perceived barriers/opportunities associated with the access and acceptability of HIV testing within Indigenous populations of Nova Scotia. In this research, the Indigenous peoples include First Nations, Metis and Inuit from on and off reserve. It is also important to note that in the Atlantic Region there is one Aboriginal AIDS Service Organization (AASO) serving four provinces, every Indigenous community in the region, both on and off reserve; Healing Our Nations (HON). The Indigenous population served by the ASO includes First Nation, Innu, Inuit and Metis. However, not all are captured in this pilot provincial qualitative study. It is intended that this research provide insight and first voice input for further investigation of HIV testing among the Indigenous communities throughout Nova Scotia, both on and off reserve, and guide further study throughout Atlantic Canada. The characteristics that contribute to the current HIV testing rates in the Indigenous populations of Nova Scotia will be investigated, identifying the on and off reserve characteristics contributing to HIV testing rates within the Indigenous peoples of Nova Scotia. Results will provide additional information about HIV testing among Canada’s Indigenous peoples and augment the effectiveness of prevention initiatives in Nova Scotia.en_US
dc.description.abstractUnderstanding the relationship between race/ethnicity and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) provides insight into HIV testing behaviour (PHAC, 2014). Nationally, Indigenous peoples of Canada represent a higher rate of HIV infection than the national average (PHAC, 2014). The purpose of this study is to explore the perceptions of HIV testing within Indigenous populations of Nova Scotia. Individual interviews were conducted to explore barriers and facilitators affecting the accessibility and acceptability of HIV testing within the Indigenous population of Nova Scotia. Further, participants were invited to share their first voice knowledge about the perceptions of HIV testing within Indigenous communities; what is needed for HIV testing to be accessible and acceptable to Indigenous populations; what are the barriers and facilitators to getting tested; and how to improve the access and acceptability of HIV testing within Indigenous populations in Nova Scotia.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectIndigenous Peoplesen_US
dc.subjectAboriginal Peoplesen_US
dc.subjectHIV testingen_US
dc.subjectHIV/AIDSen_US
dc.subjectCommunity-based researchen_US
dc.subjectNova Scotiaen_US
dc.subjecton and off reserve Indigenous peoplesen_US
dc.subjectAcceptabilityen_US
dc.subjectAccessen_US
dc.subjectAPHAen_US
dc.titleHIV Testing in Nova Scotia: An Indigenous Perspective on Access and Acceptabilityen_US
dc.date.defence2017-08-15
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Health & Human Performanceen_US
dc.contributor.degreeMaster of Artsen_US
dc.contributor.external-examinerDr Audrey Steenbeeken_US
dc.contributor.graduate-coordinatorDr Jacqueline Gahaganen_US
dc.contributor.thesis-readerRenee Maschingen_US
dc.contributor.thesis-readerDr Brenda Merritten_US
dc.contributor.thesis-supervisorDr Jacqueline Gahaganen_US
dc.contributor.ethics-approvalReceiveden_US
dc.contributor.manuscriptsNot Applicableen_US
dc.contributor.copyright-releaseNot Applicableen_US
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