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dc.contributor.authorLukac, Elijah
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-10T13:18:36Z
dc.date.available2017-08-10T13:18:36Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10222/73099
dc.description.abstractPeople have become disconnected from the producing, preparing, sharing, and celebrating of food that is such a fundamental element of identity and culture. The global industrial food system has reduced the social connections surrounding food as well as our connection to the natural ecologies that sustain us. Indeed, rather than sustaining us, this wasteful system is actively working against our wellbeing. It has become essential to reconnect cities to food by reimagining where and how it is produced, prepared and shared. By creating a new urban food system as a layer within the city of Edmonton, this thesis aims to transform urban waste into the productive and experiential framework of a complete local food culture. In this way, architecture can help to reconnect people with food so that they can once again enjoy the social, economic, and environmental wellbeing of a city shaped by an engaging relationship with food.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectArchitectureen_US
dc.subjectUrban Agricultureen_US
dc.subjectLocal Food Economyen_US
dc.subjectPermacultureen_US
dc.subjectFood Cultureen_US
dc.titleEdible Ecologies : An Architecture for the Social Life of Fooden_US
dc.date.defence2017-06-27
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Architectureen_US
dc.contributor.degreeMaster of Architectureen_US
dc.contributor.external-examinerAnne Cormieren_US
dc.contributor.graduate-coordinatorSteve Parcellen_US
dc.contributor.thesis-readerSusan Fitzgeralden_US
dc.contributor.thesis-supervisorBrian Lilleyen_US
dc.contributor.ethics-approvalNot Applicableen_US
dc.contributor.manuscriptsNot Applicableen_US
dc.contributor.copyright-releaseNot Applicableen_US
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